MSM: Study links pesticides to attention problems

(Reuters) – Children whose mothers were exposed to certain types of pesticides while pregnant were more likely to have attention problems as they grew up, U.S. researchers reported on Thursday.

The study, published in Environmental Health Perspectives, adds to evidence that organophosphate pesticides can affect the human brain.

Researchers at the University of California Berkeley tested pregnant women for evidence that organophosphate pesticides had actually been absorbed by their bodies, and then followed their children as they grew.

Women with more chemical traces of the pesticides in their urine while pregnant had children more likely to have symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD, at age 5, the researchers found.

“While results of this study are not conclusive, our findings suggest that prenatal exposure to organophosphate pesticides may affect young children’s attention,” Amy Marks and colleagues wrote in the study, available at http://ehponline.org/article/info:doi/10.1289/ehp.1002234.

To test for ADHD, the researchers questioned the mothers and also gave the children standardized tests.

Organophosphates are designed to attack the nervous systems of bugs by affecting message-carrying chemicals called neurotransmitters including acetylcholine, which is important to human brain development.

The researchers tested Mexican-American women living in the Salinas Valley of California, an area of intensive agriculture.

They looked for breakdown products or metabolites from pesticides in urine samples from the mothers during pregnancy and from their children as they grew.

Few symptoms showed up at age 3, but by age 5 the trend was significant, Marks and colleagues found.

A tenfold increase in pesticide metabolites in the mother’s urine correlated to a 500 percent increase in the chances of ADHD symptoms by age 5, with the trend stronger in boys.

A smaller increase in risk was seen if the children had pesticide metabolites in the urine.

In May a different team found children with high levels of organophosphate traces in the urine were almost twice as likely to develop ADHD as those with undetectable levels.

There are about 40 organophosphate pesticides such as malathion registered in the United States. Studies have also linked exposure to Parkinson’s, an incurable brain disease.

Source: Yahoo News

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One thought on “MSM: Study links pesticides to attention problems

  1. I’m sure this is part of the de-population giving us diseases and cancer, and the need to dumb down Americans. That way we will be like other countries. I do not even believe the eggs they are claiming to have salmonella poisoning . I think this is a false flag so they can go forward with the agenda 21 which wants control of our food sources. People are stupid and will believe that not to grow our own food maybe in our best interest, and growing and having our own farms may just be dangerous. Latley they government has been going to farms and pointing guns and going to cattle ranches and trying to steal cattle. Also, what they did to the farmers in California regarding the “almost extinct” smelt fish. Bull!!! They turned off the water to control the food source. If the fish were indangered they could have removed the “endangered fish” and given them areas to live. This country is heading towards communisum and trying to get rid of many people, social security is broke and they cant pay out. There are so many things at play here no one can keep up with the coruption anymore. Look at what our “Dear Leaders” Czars have written about as far as putting things in our water. The government thinks we are just a science project. Thats it.

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