Froot Loops contaminated with 2-methylnaphthalene chemical (opinion) – Mike Adams

(NaturalNews) – As cereal lovers sat down to enjoy their bowls of Froot Loops, Honey Smacks, Apple Jacks and Corn Pops, they had no idea they were about to eat a petrochemical called 2-methylnaphthalene. This chemical is “a constituent of petroleum, automobile exhaust, … waste water from coal gasification, coke and shale oil production…” and other similarly bizarre sources. So what was 2-methylnaphthalene doing in boxes of Kellogg cereals?

It turns out this chemical was most likely released from the wax paper cereal liners that hold the cereal. This could have been due to the heating of the wax paper when it’s sealed. This causes the off-gassing of chemicals which can then be absorbed by the cereal itself. Continue reading

MSM: Mobile phones responsible for disappearance of honey bee

(Telegraph) – Their disappearance has caused alarm throughout Europe and North America where campaigners have blamed agricultural pesticides, climate change and the advent of genetically modified crops for what is now known as ‘colony collapse disorder.’ Britain has seen a 15 per cent decline in its bee population in the last two years and shrinking numbers has led to a rise in thefts of hives.

Now researchers from Chandigarh’s Punjab University claim they have found the cause which could be the first step in reversing the decline: They have established that radiation from mobile telephones is a key factor in the phenomenon and say that it probably interfering with the bee’s navigation senses.

They set up a controlled experiment in Punjab earlier this year comparing the behaviour and productivity of bees in two hives – one fitted with two mobile telephones which were powered on for two fifteen minute sessions per day for three months. The other had dummy models installed. Read entire article

Are honey bees being killed off by chemically coated crop seeds?

(NaturalNews) – A class of insecticide that is applied to seeds and taken up into plant tissue may be responsible for much of the widespread decline in honeybee populations, increasing numbers of researchers and environmentalists are suggesting.

Starting in 2005, beekeepers in the United States first reported large numbers of bees mysteriously disappearing, and since then the problem has spread to different parts of the world. No one cause of the collapse has been identified, although front-running theories include parasites, viruses, stress from long-distance transport of hives for pollination, and pesticides.

“We do feel like pesticides are playing a role in pollinator decline,” said researcher Maryann Frazier of Penn State University. “We know that the pesticides are there. We don’t know yet exactly what role they’re playing.” Continue reading

High-Fructose Corn Syrup Produces Toxic Chemical “HMF” When Heated

(NaturalNews) – If you know anything about the food supply, you know that honey bees are a crucial part of the food production chain. In the United States, they pollinate roughly one-third of all the crops we eat, and without them, we’d be facing a disastrous collapse in viable food production. Continue reading

Mobile towers threatening honey bees in Kerala

(Press Trust of India) – Mobile towers are posing a threat to honey bees in Kerala withe electromagnetic radiation from mobile towers and cell phones having the potential to kill worker bees that go out to collect nectar from flowers, says a study. Continue reading

Potential Food Shortages… in America?

Holly Note: In recent days, numerous stories detail crop and livestock damage. Drought, floods, hail and freezes have bitten our foods, but whatever the cause, the result is the same — destroyed or damaged food supplies. These ultimately lead to higher store prices, shortages and in more extreme circumstances, rationing. Continue reading

Honeybee shortage threatens fruit and vegetable producers in Japan

There are too few honeybees in Japan. While one immediately associates the busy yellow and black insects with honey, Japan’s honey production is not the area of agriculture most threatened by the decline in the bee population. Fruit and vegetable farmers also depend on honeybees to pollinate their plants, and the shortage of bees has gone so far as to create fears of a produce shortage, one that could threaten dinner tables across Japan. Continue reading